http://nmllorens.website/files/gimgs/th-50_CLASS_art_intro_artists.jpg
Found exam flashcard, stairwell Cooper Union. Photo: NML
 

19th and 20th CENTURY ART HISTORY
Fall 2014 - Spring 2016
The Cooper Union

This course is a year-long, two-semester required seminar survey of 19th and 20th Century art history for Freshman art studio majors. Classes are small, and there is a continuity between the semesters that allows for a rich common vocabulary. The challenge with this course is to balance due diligence to the art historical canon, without knowledge of which students would be at a disadvantage with their peers, with the political imperative to destabilize notions of artistic mastery that are endemic to masculinism. I want students to leave with an understanding of how each successive generation of artists articulated their claim to radicalism.

I feel a responsibility to give art students as much control over the language that touches art as possible. This is real task of such courses: to grant artists the confidence to choose when to reject analytical language.


EXCERPTED SYLLABUS
If you find this list useful, get in touch and tell me what you would edit or found lacking: firstnamelastname[at]gmail

Stephen F Eisenman and Thomas E. Crow, Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History : with 510 Illustrations, 233 in Colour. London: Thames & Hudson, 2011
Albert Boime, “The French Revolution (1789-1799),” in Art in an Age of Revolution, 1750-1800 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987)
T.J. Clark, “Painting in the Year 2,” Representations 47 (Summer 1994), p. 13-63
Ewa Lajer-Burcharth, “David’s Sabine Women: Body, Gender and Republican Culture Under the Directory,” Art History Vol. 14, No. 3 (September 1991), 397 – 430
T.J. Clark, Chapter 1 “The View from Notre-Dame,” in The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers (1999), p. 23-78

Charles Baudelaire, The Painter of Modern Life (1863) Sections I, IV, IX, and XII
Abigail Solomon-Godeau, “The Other Side of Vertu: Alternative Masculinities in the Crucible of Revolution,” Art Journal 56, No. 2 (Summer, 1997), pp. 55-61
Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, “Rumor, Contagion and Colonization in Gros’s Plague-Stricken of Jaffa (1804),” Representations, No. 51 (Summer, 1995), 1 – 46
Andrew Schulz, “Satirizing the Senses: The Representation of Perception in Goya’s Los Caprichos,” Art History 23:2 (2000), pp. 153–181
Albert Boime, “Turner’s Slave Ship: The Victims of Empire,” Turner Studies 10 (Summer 1990): 34 – 43
Jonathan Crary, “Géricault, the Panorama, and Sites of Reality in the Early Nineteenth Century,” Grey Room No. 9 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 5-25
Linda Nochlin, “The Imaginary Orient, ” in The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth Century Art and Society (New York: Harper and Row, 1989), 33 – 57
Ewa Lajer-Burcharth, “Modernity and the Condition of Disguise: Manet’s ‘Absinthe Drinker,’” Art Journal, Vol. 45, No. 1, Manet (Spring 1985), pp. 18 – 26
Linda Nochlin, “Why Have There Been No Great Female Artists?” Artnews, 1971
Tim Barringer, Reading the Pre-Raphaelites (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998)
Tony Bennett, “The Exhibitionary Complex,” New Formations 4 (Spring 1988), p. 73-102
Griselda Pollock, “Modernity and the spaces of femininity,” in Vision and Difference: Femininity, Feminism, and Histories of Art (London and New York: Routledge, 1988), 50 -90
Jonathan Crary, “Unbinding Vision,” October 68 (Spring 1994), p. 21-44
Robert Herbert, “Method and Meaning in Monet,” Art in America 67, no. 5 (September 1979), p. 90-108
Anne Higonnet, Berthe Morisot's Images of Women (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992)
Tamar Garb, “Gustave Caillebotte’s Male Figures: Masculinity, Muscularity and Modernity,” in Bodies of Modernity: Figure and Flesh in Fin-de-Siècle France (London: Thames and Hudson, 1998), 25 – 53
Linda Nochlin, “Seurat’s Grande Jatte: An Anti-Utopian Allegory,” Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies, Vol. 14, No. 2, The Grande Jatte at 100 (1989), 132-153+241-242
Aruna D’Souza, Cézanne's Bathers: Biography and the Erotics of Paint (University Park, Pa: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008)
Anne Higonnet, "Myths of Creation: Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin," in Significant Others, Eds. Isabelle de Courtivron & Whitney Chadwick (London, Thames & Hudson, 1993)

Hal Foster, Rosalind E. Krauss, Yve-Alain Bois, B H. D. Buchloh, and David Joselit. Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism. (New York : Thames & Hudson 2004)
Erica Zuurn and Christina Svendsen, The Trumpets of Jericho, (Cambridge, Massachusetts : Wakefield Press, 2015)
Rosalind Krauss, “In the Name of Picasso,” October 16 (Spring 1981): 5-22
Emily Braun, “Vulgarians at the Gate” in Laura Mattioni Rossi, ed., Boccioni’s Materia: A Futurists Masterpiece and the Avant-garde in Milan and Paris (New York: Guggenheim, 2004) 1 - 21
Walter Benjamin and J.A Underwood, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. London: Penguin Books Ltd, 2008
Walter Benjamin, “The Author as Producer” in Understanding Brecht. London: NLB, 1973
Rosalind Krauss, “Corpus Dilecti” October Vol. 33 (Summer, 1985), pp. 31-72
Olu Oguibe, “Photography and the Substance of the Image,” in In/Sight: African photographers, 1940 to the present (N.Y.: Guggenheim, 1996), 231-50
Manthia Diawara, “Talk of the Town,” Artforum 36 (February 1998), pp. 64-71
Okwui Enwezor, “Gesture, Pose, Mimesis: Seydou Keïta Portraits” in Events of the self : portraiture and social identity : contemporary African photography from the Walther Collection (Walther Collection; Göttingen: Steidl, 2010)
Alan Kaprow, “On Jackson Pollock,” in Essays on the Blurring of Art and Life (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 19930, pp. 1-9
Mignon Nixon and Louise Bourgeois, Fantastic Reality: Louise Bourgeois and a Story of Modern Art. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2005
Andreas Huyssen, “Mass Culture as Woman: Modernism’s Other,” in After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986
Mignon Nixon, “Spero’s Curses,” October Fall 2007, No. 122, pgs 3-30
Michael Fried, “Art and Objecthood” in Art and Objecthood: Essays and Reviews (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998)
Hal Foster, “The Crux of Minimalism,” in The Return of the Real: The Avant-Garde at the End of the Century. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1996
Jennifer King, “Perpetually out of Place: Michael Asher and Jean-Antoine Houdon at the Art Institute of Chicago,” October, Vol. 120 (Spring, 2007), pp. 71-86
Rosalyn Deutsche, “Boystown,” Society and Space 9, no. 1 (March 1991): 5–30
Craig Owens, “The Discourse of Others” in Beyond Recognition: Representation, Power, and Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992
John Pfeffer, Art and the End of Apartheid (Minneapolis: U of Minnesota Press, 2009)
Carolyn Christov-Bakaigiev, “William Kentridge,” (Brussels : Societe des Expositions du Palais des B-A de Bruxelles, 1998) 9-39
Miwon Kwon, “One Place After Another” October Vol. 80 (Spring, 1997), pp. 85-110